Shingle back
Tiliqua rugosa is a short-tailed, slow moving species of blue-tongued skink found in Australia. Three of the four recognized subspecies are found only in Western Australia, where they are known collectively by the common name bobtail. The name shingleback is also used, especially for T. rugosa asper, the only subspecies native to eastern Australia. T. rugosa has a heavily armoured body and can be found in various colours, ranging from dark brown to cream. It has a short, wide, stumpy tail that resembles its head and may confuse predators. The tail also contains fat reserves, which are drawn upon during hibernation in winter. This skink is an omnivore; it eats snails and plants and spends much of its time browsing through vegetation for food. It is often seen sunning on roadsides or other paved areas.Apart from bobtail and shingleback, a variety of other common names are used, including stump-tailed skink, bogeye, pinecone lizard and sleepy lizard. T. rugosa has a heavily armoured body and can be found in various colours, ranging from dark brown to cream.Its total length seldom exceeds 25 inches, but it is a very heavy-bodied lizard for its length.It has a triangular head and a bright blue tongue. Its short, stumpy tail is similar in shape to its head. This possibly evolved as a defence mechanism against predators, and has led to the common name of "two-headed skink".[4] Its short tail also contains fat reserves, which the lizard lives upon during hibernation in winter. Unlike many skinks, shinglebacks do not exhibit autotomy and cannot shed their tails
Shingle back
Tiliqua rugosa is a short-tailed, slow moving species of blue- tongued skink found in Australia. Three of the four recognized subspecies are found only in Western Australia, where they are known collectively by the common name bobtail. The name shingleback is also used, especially for T. rugosa asper, the only subspecies native to eastern Australia. T. rugosa has a heavily armoured body and can be found in various colours, ranging from dark brown to cream. It has a short, wide, stumpy tail that resembles its head and may confuse predators. The tail also contains fat reserves, which are drawn upon during hibernation in winter. This skink is an omnivore; it eats snails and plants and spends much of its time browsing through vegetation for food. It is often seen sunning on roadsides or other paved areas.Apart from bobtail and shingleback, a variety of other common names are used, including stump-tailed skink, bogeye, pinecone lizard and sleepy lizard. T. rugosa has a heavily armoured body and can be found in various colours, ranging from dark brown to cream.Its total length seldom exceeds 25 inches, but it is a very heavy-bodied lizard for its length.It has a triangular head and a bright blue tongue. Its short, stumpy tail is similar in shape to its head. This possibly evolved as a defence mechanism against predators, and has led to the common name of "two-headed skink".[4] Its short tail also contains fat reserves, which the lizard lives upon during hibernation in winter. Unlike many skinks, shinglebacks do not exhibit autotomy and cannot shed their tails