Bearded dragon
There are three types of bearded dragons  in Australia; the Eastern Bearded Dragon  (Pogona Barbata)the Pygmy Bearded Dragon (P. henrylawsoni) the Central Bearded Dragon  (Pogona vitticeps)   The Eastern Bearded Dragon occurs along the length of the Great Dividing Range  and is replaced in arid areas by the Central Bearded Dragon. The Pygmy Bearded Dragon is native to  the plains of Central Queensland. Bearded dragons are a sun-loving species and are quite often seen  basking on the side of a road or on  fence posts and  logs. Bearded dragons are known for the distinctive flap of skin which lies below  their bottom jaw. If threatened, the bearded dragon will imediately take on a defensive posture by   opening their mouths and pushing their throat skin forward to make their  beard protrude as far  forward  as possible having combined this with the strong spikes which line the lizard's throat and  the side of its body acting as a wonderful deterrent to most predators.
Our Bearded dragon
               Bearded dragon
There are three types of bearded dragons  in Australia; the Eastern Bearded Dragon  (Pogona Barbata)the Pygmy Bearded Dragon (P. henrylawsoni) the Central Bearded Dragon  (Pogona vitticeps)   The Eastern Bearded Dragon occurs along the length of the Great Dividing Range  and is replaced in arid areas by the Central Bearded Dragon. The Pygmy Bearded Dragon is native to  the plains of Central Queensland. Bearded dragons are a sun-loving species and are quite often seen  basking on the side of a road or on  fence posts and  logs. Bearded dragons are known for the distinctive flap of skin which lies below  their bottom jaw. If threatened, the bearded dragon will imediately take on a defensive posture by   opening their mouths and pushing their throat skin forward to make their  beard protrude as far  forward  as possible having combined this with the strong spikes which line the lizard's throat and  the side of its body acting as a wonderful deterrent to most predators.
Our Bearded dragon
Of the three  species, the pygmy dragon's beard is less pronounced. Measuring 10 -15 cm from head to  vent (the anus), it is roughly half the size of the central and eastern bearded dragons (each of which  can grow up to 30 cm from head to vent). The tail of each of these species is about the same length as  their body. Thus the larger lizards may grow as long as 60 cm. Compared to the pygmy bearded  dragon, the head of the central and eastern bearded dragon is much broader in relation to its body. All three are predominantly grey in colour with some variation towards orange, fawn, brown and  black. This variation is largely dependant on locality, temperature, and in the case of the central and  eastern bearded dragons, selective breeding. Bearded dragons regulate their body temperature  through subtle changes in shades of colour, from light to dark; becoming darker in cooler weather  and vice-versa. Colour change can also depend on emotional state, with colouration becoming more  obvious when startled or in an aggressive posture. Selective breeding, especially amongst United  States based herpetologists, has influenced colour variation such that distinctive oranges, blues,  reds, apricot and tiger stripes are apparent in the central bearded dragons and white is known to  occur in the eastern bearded dragon
               Bearded dragon
There are three types of bearded dragons  in Australia; the Eastern Bearded Dragon  (Pogona Barbata)the Pygmy Bearded Dragon (P. henrylawsoni) the Central Bearded Dragon  (Pogona vitticeps)   The Eastern Bearded Dragon occurs along the length of the Great Dividing Range  and is replaced in arid areas by the Central Bearded Dragon. The Pygmy Bearded Dragon is native to  the plains of Central Queensland. Bearded dragons are a sun-loving species and are quite often seen  basking on the side of a road or on  fence posts and  logs. Bearded dragons are known for the distinctive flap of skin which lies below  their bottom jaw. If threatened, the bearded dragon will imediately take on a defensive posture by   opening their mouths and pushing their throat skin forward to make their  beard protrude as far  forward  as possible having combined this with the strong spikes which line the lizard's throat and  the side of its body acting as a wonderful deterrent to most predators.
Our Bearded dragon